Bondi Beach coastal walk, Sydney: From Bondi to Bronte

Bondi Beach coastal walk, Sydney: From Bondi to Bronte

Sydney is a city of spectacular views, and its ocean coastline is no exception. If you’re looking to combine visiting one of Sydney’s must-see destinations with stretching your legs and escaping the concrete jungle for a few hours, the Bondi to Bronte coastal walk is the perfect afternoon excursion. One of the most popular oceanside walks in Sydney, the 2km footpath is popular with walkers and joggers alike, and can be easily completed by most visitors in 30-40 minutes, not allowing for stops along the way.

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Spectacular Bondi Beach

Bondi Beach

Bondi Beach is the quintessential Aussie surfing destination, at least in the eyes of those of us who grew up overseas. A broad white sand beach is lined by apartments, shops and restaurants, while waves crash on the headlands to either side. Life guards are on duty, and the beach is a great spot to sit and watch the surfers, or even take a few lessons yourself.

Heading south from the beach, however, is the start of the Bondi cliff walk that leads south down the coast towards Bronte Beach and Coogee. Well paved and accessible, the route takes you high above the surf with spectacular views along the coastine.

The first place you will pass is the Bondi Icebergs pool, a historic local landmark for over 100 years. A large lap pool lies right on the water’s edge, with a smaller kids’ pool close by. Open to the public every day except Thursdays, it’s a perfect opportunity to enjoy the Bondi beachside life for those who don’t feel confident in the ocean currents.

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The dramatic coastal path just south of Bondi

Mackenzies Point

Continuing along the cliff path, the next notable attraction is an Aboriginal rock carving at Mackenzies Point, a large headland some 500m south of Bondi. Depicting a large fish or whale, the carving is easy to miss; look out for it on the left hand (seaward) side of the path. A small plaque nearby gives more information about the carving.

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Aboriginal rock carvings at Mackenzies Point

Tamarama Beach

Around 500m further down the coast you will reach Tamarama Bay. Nicknamed “Glamorama” by locals, this narrow, deep beach is the place to see and be seen. Tiny it may be – one of the smallest beaches on this part of the coast – but Tamarama’s waters are deep, with dangerous tides. Tamarama Surf Club lies to the north of the beach, but this is definitely a spot to sunbathe rather than swim unless you know what you’re doing.

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Tamarama Beach, home of the beautiful

Bronte Beach

A few hundred metres further around the cliffs, and you will reach your destination, Bronte Beach. This popular stretch of sand, backed by parkland and cafes, is home to the Bondi to Bronte ocean swim each December. The surf here is gentler that at Tamarama, but dangerous rips can make the waters unsafe for those who don’t know them well. However, a rock pool towards the south of the beach provides the perfect bathing spot for the less strong swimmer, and an ocean pool is also located towards the south of the beach.

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Bronte Beach

Extending your walk

For those wanting to stretch their legs even further, the cliff path continues south to Coogee Beach via Clovelly Beach and Gordons Bay. Total walking distance from Bronte to Coogee is approximately 4km or a little over an hour’s walk without stops. Total walking distance from Bondi to Coogee is around 6km.

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Bondi Beach, the quintessential Aussie surfing destination

Getting there and away

Bondi and Bronte Beaches are both easily reached by public transport from Sydney city centre. Take the T4 South Coast Line train from Martin Place station in the CBD to Bondi Junction (journey time 8 minutes); from there, take the 333, 380 or 381 bus to Bondi Beach (journey time 15 minutes).

Once you reach Bronte Beach, the 361 bus will take you from the north end of the beach back to Bondi Junction (journey time 11 minutes) to pick up the train back to the city centre.



Check out more Australian experiences from Reading the Book Travel!


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For a breath of fresh ocean air, the Bondi Beach coastal walk is the perfect way to spend an afternoon on your Sydney vacation! | Bondi cliff walk | Bondi coastal walk | Tamarama Beach | Bondi Beach | Bronte Beach | Bondi to Coogee walk | Bondi Beach to Bronte Beach walk | Bondi to Bronte walk | #bondibeach #bonditobronte #bondicoastalwalk #visitsydney #sydneyaustraliaFor a breath of fresh ocean air, the Bondi Beach coastal walk is the perfect way to spend an afternoon on your Sydney vacation! | Bondi cliff walk | Bondi coastal walk | Tamarama Beach | Bondi Beach | Bronte Beach | Bondi to Coogee walk | Bondi Beach to Bronte Beach walk | Bondi to Bronte walk | #bondibeach #bonditobronte #bondicoastalwalk #visitsydney #sydneyaustralia

 

Hi! I’m Jill, and I’m a British blogger who has been travelling for more than 15 years, visiting 65 countries on 6 continents. I love to travel both solo and with groups, and to discover the cultures and peoples of the countries I visit. And I love to share a good story or two along the way!

Uluru base walk: Up close with an Australian icon

Uluru base walk: Up close with an Australian icon

If there is one iconic image of Australia, it has to be Uluru. This massive monolith, sitting in the heart of the continent, combines the drama of the outback with an incredible heritage, and a silhouette which is recognisable the world over. Thousands flock to the former Ayers Rock every year; but how do you get a different perspective on a landscape that is so well known? Well, the answer is simple: take an Uluru base walk.

If you look for Uluru on a map, you will find it just southwest of the centre point of Australia, in the bottom corner of the Northern Territory. Hundreds of kilometres from the nearest town of any size, the tourist industry surrounding it has created its own: the settlement of Yulara, with its own airport receiving flights from all across Australia. Everyone arriving has come for the same reason, to explore stunning Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park. Yulara is really one large resort, with accommodation for every budget from campsites to luxury hotels. Having said that, a cheap destination it is not; even the most basic accommodation is pricey, but for those who can afford it the destination is one of the highlights of a trip to Australia.

Thousands flock to Uluru every year; but how do you get a different perspective on this famous rock? Simple: take an Uluru base walk. | Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park | Ayers Rock | Northern Territory Australia | Yulara | Anangu Aboriginal Community |Walk right around Uluru #uluru #yulara #ulurubasewalk

Uluru is actually just the uppermost part of a massive sandstone rock, extending far beneath the desert floor. Over millennia the surrounding land has worn down, leaving a massive, domed portion exposed to a height of 863m above the desert landscape. Deeply spiritually important to the local Anangu people, the Aboriginal tribe who are the historic keepers of this land, Uluru has long been a subject of controversy. To the outsider, the Rock presents an appealing challenge: the 1km climb to the summit, steep at first but made easier by a fixed rope before it levels out higher up, is comparatively easy to undertake for those of reasonable fitness – although it can be dangerous, and even lethal in the summer heat when the climb is often shut. But, to the Anangu, for anyone other than a member of their tribe to climb Uluru is, quite simply, sacrilegious and deeply offensive.

Thousands flock to Uluru every year; but how do you get a different perspective on this famous rock? Simple: take an Uluru base walk. | Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park | Ayers Rock | Northern Territory Australia | Yulara | Anangu Aboriginal Community |Walk right around Uluru #uluru #yulara #ulurubasewalk

For me, visiting Uluru for the first time, the decision was ridiculously easy. Quite aside from not wanting to be disrespectful (not to mention that the climb is still HARD), standing on top of the rock wasn’t going to give me a better view from the one on the flight into Yulara the previous day. I wanted to see the rock up close, examine its folds and canyons, and learn about the culture. Which is where the base walk comes in.

There are actually a number of different walks, of various lengths, that can be taken from the visitors’ centre at the base of the rock. The base walk is the biggie, a full 10km around the full circumference of Uluru. Taking around 3.5 hours to complete, the walk is best at sunrise, before the heat hits the desert, and in the company of a local guide who can explain the significance of the various portions of the rock.

Thousands flock to Uluru every year; but how do you get a different perspective on this famous rock? Simple: take an Uluru base walk. | Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park | Ayers Rock | Northern Territory Australia | Yulara | Anangu Aboriginal Community |Walk right around Uluru #uluru #yulara #ulurubasewalk

Sunrise with Wally the guide…

We therefore set off early, the sky lightening in the east in an arrange of spectacular colours which silhouetted the desert vegetation and gave the rock a purple tone which was only a taste of the variations to come. Uluru at sunset draws the big crowds, but Uluru at sunrise had a calm and peaceful beauty all of its own. As the sun rose, the rock turned gradually more orange, but in a range of stripes and striations that were unlike anything I was expecting. It’s easy to think of Uluru as a regular structure, a smooth dome; but it is full of rifts and valleys and rocky overhangs, striped yellow and orange and red and purple. The bright green of the desert trees and bushes stand in stark counterpoint, and waterfalls either crash or trickle down the sides of the rock depending on the time of year. Mostly they appear as a series of narrow ribbons, shaping the sides of the rock and plunging into little oases of vegetation at its base. Uluru up close is beautiful and varied, and can only be appreciated in such close proximity.

Thousands flock to Uluru every year; but how do you get a different perspective on this famous rock? Simple: take an Uluru base walk. | Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park | Ayers Rock | Northern Territory Australia | Yulara | Anangu Aboriginal Community |Walk right around Uluru #uluru #yulara #ulurubasewalk

The further the walk takes you from the starting point, the more the crowds thin out and the more you have the place to yourself. We could spy the Anangu township in the distance as our guide explained the various parts of Uluru and their significance to the local people. Sections of the rock are particularly sacred, and signs request that visitors refrain from photography in these areas. It makes them even more special, and forces even the most enthusiastic photographer (myself included) to breathe in and really absorb the landscape. As well as the spiritual significance of the area, Aboriginal artwork, centuries old, decorates caves and overhangs. Despite the number of visitors to Uluru each year, we felt like the first people to discover its secrets as we explored the nooks and crannies of this incredible place. It was magical.

Thousands flock to Uluru every year; but how do you get a different perspective on this famous rock? Simple: take an Uluru base walk. | Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park | Ayers Rock | Northern Territory Australia | Yulara | Anangu Aboriginal Community |Walk right around Uluru #uluru #yulara #ulurubasewalk

My walk around the base of Uluru was eye-opening, both in the history and spirituality of the site, and in the beauty and variety of the landscape. It may be 10km, but the walk is level and easy, and cool in the early hours of the day, even in the summer months when I visited. It is, for me, the very best way to get the most out of your visit to this Aussie icon.

Thousands flock to Uluru every year; but how do you get a different perspective on this famous rock? Simple: take an Uluru base walk. | Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park | Ayers Rock | Northern Territory Australia | Yulara | Anangu Aboriginal Community |Walk right around Uluru #uluru #yulara #ulurubasewalk


How to get to Uluru:

The only easy way to reach Uluru is by plane. It is possible to drive from the Outback city of Alice Springs (470 km / 6 hours), but otherwise, a scheduled flight into Yulara (YUL) is the only option.

Where to stay at Uluru

All accommodation in the area is at the Ayers Rock Resort. Located 20km from Uluru itself so as not to encroach on the beauty of the area, the resort has a monopoly but offers many different standards of accommodation in a variety of hotels and campsites. In July 2018, the cheapest campsite pitch costs AU$43 per night (approx US$32).

Uluru tours

A multitude of different tours are available in the area, to Uluru itself as well as to neighbouring Kata Tjuta and Kings Canyon. For options, check out the Ayers Rock Resort website or AAT Kings, among others. Or why not consider a Segway tour if you don’t fancy the walk?

Doing it yourself

Fancy putting together your own self-guided trip to the Red Centre? Crystal at Castaway with Crystal has plenty of advice on how you can create your own Uluru adventure!

However you do it, it’s well worth the effort.



Want to experience an Uluru base walk for yourself? Pin this post for later!

Thousands flock to Uluru every year; but how do you get a different perspective on this famous rock? Simple: take an Uluru base walk. | Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park | Ayers Rock | Northern Territory Australia | Yulara | Anangu Aboriginal Community |Walk right around Uluru #uluru #yulara #ulurubasewalkThousands flock to Uluru every year; but how do you get a different perspective on this famous rock? Simple: take an Uluru base walk. | Uluru Kata Tjuta National Park | Ayers Rock | Northern Territory Australia | Yulara | Anangu Aboriginal Community |Walk right around Uluru #uluru #yulara #ulurubasewalk

Hi! I’m Jill, and I’m a British blogger who has been travelling for more than 15 years, visiting 65 countries on 6 continents. I love to travel both solo and with groups, and to discover the cultures and peoples of the countries I visit. And I love to share a good story or two along the way!